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715 NW Dimmick Street
Grants Pass, OR 97526
Phone: (541) 474-5325
Fax: (541) 474-5353
Contact: Michael Weber - Public Health Director
Email: 
Hours: 8:00 am - 4:30 pm M-Th (Closed 12-12:30 for lunch), Closed Fridays, WIC 7:00-5:00 M-Th (Closed for lunch 12:30-1:00pm), Closed Fridays
H1N1 (Swine) Flu Information

What is H1N1 virus?

H1N1 flu is an influenza A virus normally found in pigs. There are many such viruses and they rarely infect humans. The virus currently causing human illness is a new type of swine flu that has developed the ability to infect people and be transmitted from person to person (Source: http://www.flu.oregon.gov/).

How does one get the virus?

Although this new virus is called "swine flu," it is not transmitted from pigs to humans, or from eating pork products. Like other respiratory diseases, it is spread from person to person through coughs and sneezes. When people cough or sneeze, they spread germs through the air or on to surfaces that other people may touch (Source: http://www.flu.oregon.gov/).

What are some simple things I can do to prevent contracting the virus?

  • Wash your hands frequently 
  • Cover your cough (preferably not with your hands)
  • Stay home (from work or school) when you are sick
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are ill

Practice other good health habits such as eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, getting sufficient rest and not smoking.

Consult a health care provider if:

  • Rapidly worsening illness
  • Unresponsive and unable to get out of bed
  • Chest pain or difficulty breathing

Please note a person cannot contract the swine flu virus from eating pork or pork related products.  Undercooked or improperly cooked pork can, however, lead to other potential infectious diseases.  Be sure to always cook your pork to an internal temperature of 145F and wash your hands thoroughly anytime after coming into contact with raw meat products.

 

H1N1 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)/What to Do If You Get Sick

H1N1 (Swine) Flu Facts

 

Click on a pdf file below to learn more fast facts about H1N1 (Swine) Flu.

 




PDF -   H1N1 SWINE FLU FACT SHEET - ENGLISH.PDFSpacer(934.2KB)

PDF -   H1N1 FACT SHEET SPANISH 10-1-09.PDFSpacer(585.3KB)

PDF -   CHILDREN AT RISK FACT SHEET.PDFSpacer(689.5KB)
H1N1 facts for children

PDF -   PREPARING FOR PANDEMIC H1N1 10-7-09.PDFSpacer(12191.9KB)

PDF -   SENIORS AND THE FLU FACTS 10-13-09.PDFSpacer(564.2KB)
H1N1 flu facts for seniors

PDF - H1N1 Flu Hotline Flyer   9308_FLU_HOTLINE_FLYER_FINAL.PDFSpacer(83.5KB)
H1N1 Flu Hotline Flyer English

PDF - H1N1 Hotline Flyer Spanish   9308_FLU_HOTLINE_FLYER_SP_FINAL.PDFSpacer(87.1KB)
H1N1 Flu Hotline Flyer Spanish
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