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1420 Brookside Blvd
Grants Pass, OR 97526
Phone: 541-474-5458
Fax: (541) 956-5853
Contact: Diane Hoover
Email: 
Hours: Monday-Friday 10:00am -4:30pm Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm; Closed Sunday & Monday
Animal Protection

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Description

 

Mission Statement:

To promote a humane, safe and healthy environment for our animals and our community

 

Objectives

 

Program Purpose:

  • Maintain a clean and disease free environment for sheltered animals.
  • Enforce Animal Regulation and Protection State laws, Local Ordinances and Mandates.
  • Provide professional and compassionate animal services through shelter, adoption, educational programs, population control and health care services while remaining fiscally responsible.
  • Create a sense of community ownership.·     

 

VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO HELP PLAY AND WALK WITH THE ANIMALS!!! PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION. 541-474-5458.

To review animal control laws in the State of Oregon, click on the attached link:

http://www.animallaw.info/statutes/stusorst433_340_609_994.htm



Adopt, Love & License Your Dog

 

It could save lives!

*A license says that your dog is a pet                              

*A license insures a five day stay at the shelter if your dog is lost and brought to the shelter

Your pet license fees pay for these animal services:

*Reunite pets with their owners

* Investigate complaints about animal abuse

* Investigate complaints & bite incidents

 

How Do I License My Dog?

IT’S EASY!  Bring proof  of current rabies vaccination  to the Public Health Department at  715 NW Dimmick Street or the Animal Shelter at 1420 Brookside in Merlin to license your dog today!

Altered Dogs  $20

Unaltered Dogs  $40

Hours of Operation:  Tues. - Fri. 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.  Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

 

Did you know that the potential fine for an unlicensed dog is $260?  (EEK!)

License your loved ones TODAY!!!


Herpes Virus in Horses
 
The herpes virus is a large family of viruses. There are five known subtypes in horses, but Equine Herpes Virus-1 (EHV-1) and EHV-4 are the two severest forms of the virus. EHV-3 is another type of major herpes virus, although it is normally associated with coital exanthema, a venereal disease that can be transmitted to horses. Fortunately, this virus is very species-specific, meaning that humans do not catch equine herpes virus, and vice versa.
The different classifications of equine herpes virus affect different systems; one affects the reproductive and neurological systems, whereas another causes respiratory issues. The virus type will also determine the symptoms the horse displays.
 
Symptoms 
The incubation period for the virus depends on the subtype affecting the horse, but it is generally 4 to 10 days, after which the following symptoms may be seen:

  • Fever
  • Nasal discharge
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Decreased fitness performance
  • Weakness in hind legs
  • Strange gait
  • Anorexia
  • Lethargy

Neurological issues may occur, such as paralysis or uncoordinated body movements (ataxia), even seizures, the inability to stand up, and death. This is usually in cases of EHV-1.
EHV-1 can also cause abortions in pregnant mares.
 
Causes
Equine herpes virus is highly contagious and spreads from horse to horse rapidly through inhalation of respiratory secretions, as well as direct contact.  The virus can also spread through contaminated equipment, clothing, and hands. Equine herpes virus is everywhere in the U.S. and there tend to be severe outbreaks in a portion of the horse population about every year, usually affiliated with stables or shows that have a high volume of horses traveling through.
 
Diagnosis
A veterinarian can make a diagnosis of the equine herpes virus by the clinical signs the horse is presenting and nasal swabs.
 
Treatment
Since herpes is a virus, there is no cure. Only supportive care will help with the recovery of the horse. Herpes viruses have the ability to remain dormant in the horse's body and re-emerge at any time. When an outbreak occurs strict quarantine must be followed to avoid passing from one horse to another.
However, there are medications, such as antibiotics, that can help with the secondary infections that can occur while the horse’s immune system is trying to fight off the viral infection. Anti-inflammatory drugs may be administered to help keep the horse comfortable and encourage the horse to remain eating and drinking.
 
Prevention
There are vaccines that can give horses immunity against the herpes virus. These vaccines must be administered on a regular basis, usually every year, or sometimes every six months if the horse is at high risk for contracting the disease.
 
 
Concerned owners should contact their veterinarian if they have questions.

                           

 

 

 

 

 

 



Links
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Facebook for Josephine County Animal Shelter
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Facebook page for Shelter Friends
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License/Adoption/Complaint Forms/Record Request
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OREGON AIDS/STD Hotline
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Oregon Health Authority's Maternal Mental Health
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Shelter Friends Website
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Volunteer Application
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