Quarantine and Isolation Information

Quarantine Protocol

If you have had possible exposure to someone with COVID-19 infection, you should quarantine for 14 days. Infection is contagious during the days prior to feeling sick, so quarantining is important in order to minimize the chances of spreading the disease. Exposure means being within 6 feet of the infected individual for at least 15 minutes within a 24-hour period. 

As of April 29, 2021, if you are fully vaccinated (it has been at least two weeks since your final COVID-19 vaccination), you do not need to quarantine. However, it is important that you immediately isolate if you develop symptoms in case you contract COVID-19 disease despite appropriate vaccination. 

 

Separate Yourself from Other People and Animals in your Home

  • Stay in your own room and away from other people in your home as much as possible. Use a separate bedroom and bathroom, if available.
  • Increase airflow in shared spaces like the kitchen or bathroom by opening windows.
  • If you need help, have just one person who is healthy provide help for you.
  • Avoid contact with pets and other animals while sick. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals. If you must care for your pet, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask.

Wear a Face Covering

Wear a cloth, paper or disposable face covering when you are around others or pets, and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a face covering, people who live with you should not be in the same room with you, or they should wear a face covering if they enter your room.
 

Cover your Coughs and Sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can and immediately clean your hands as described below.
 

Clean your Hands Often

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60–90% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry. Soap and water are preferred if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
 

Avoid Sharing Personal Household Items

Do not share dishes, utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.
 

Clean all Highly Touched Surfaces Often

Frequently touched surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or disinfectant wipe according to the instructions on the label. Bathroom and toilet surfaces should be cleaned often (at least daily) with household cleaner and then with a disinfecting bleach. 
 

What if Someone in my Household Becomes Sick?

If you or someone else in your household becomes sick with symptoms (cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fever, muscle/body aches, headaches, loss of smell or taste, sore throat, congestion, runny nose, fatigue, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting), it is possible that they have COVID-19. They should contact their healthcare provider for medical advice, including asking if they should be tested, especially if they are over the age of 65, pregnant or have chronic medical conditions. They should also follow all the precautions described above.
 

Isolation Protocol

If you have been diagnosed with COVID-19 disease, you need to isolate for 10-20 days depending on the severity of infection and your provider’s orders. Isolating decreases the chances of spreading the disease. 

If you were in contact with household members two days prior to developing symptoms, those people are already at risk for COVID-19 and should quarantine.
  • Stay in your own living space and away from other people at all times. You may exercise outside alone.
  • Keep a wall or window between you and anyone living in the home who does not have COVID.
  • Use a separate bedroom (and bathroom, if possible).
  • If you are sharing a bathroom, all contact surfaces, or surfaces containing blood, urine, phlegm, stool or other bodily fluid must be sterilized using a household disinfectant or disinfecting wipe and then cleaned with a disinfecting bleach. Follow instructions on all labels. Wear gloves and a mask while disinfecting. 
  • Open windows and turn on a fan, when possible, before leaving a room.
  • If you need help, have just one person who is healthy assist you. Avoid physical contact, always wear a face covering and remain at least 6 feet apart while in the same room.
    • If your helper comes into direct contact with you or any bodily fluids (including blood, urine, phlegm or stool) or is closer than 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or longer, that person will then be at risk of infection and will need to quarantine (stay at home and away from others who could become infected), not only for the time of your 10 total days of isolation but also for an additional 10 days.
    • If those who live in the home develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19 they need to contact their Primary Care Provider and tell them they are at risk for COVID-19 and what symptoms they are experiencing. If symptoms are severe and they are unable to go to urgent care or the emergency room, they need to call 911. Tell them they are at risk for COVID-19. A face mask should be applied before coming in contact with emergency services personnel. 
  • Your helper may deliver food to your door, leave it outside the shut door and leave prior to you opening the door. Dirty dishes and laundry should be left outside of the closed door and handled only with gloved hands and a mask. 
 

Stay Home Except to get Medical Care

You should stay home except if you need medical care — be sure to call ahead and let them know you have tested positive for COVID-19; this will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected. Do not go to work, school or public areas. To the extent possible, avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing or taxis.
 

Wear a Cloth, Paper or Disposable Face Covering

Wear a cloth, paper or disposable face covering when you cannot avoid being around other people (for example, sharing a room or vehicle) or pets, and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a cloth, paper or disposable face covering (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not be in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Face shields are not adequate.
 

Cover Your Coughs and Sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can and immediately clean your hands as described below.
 

Clean Your Hands Often

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60–90% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry. Soap and water are preferred if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
 

Avoid Sharing Personal Household Items

Do not share dishes, utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.
 

Clean All Frequently Touched Surfaces Every Day

Frequently touched surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets and bedside tables. Clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or disinfectant wipe according to the instructions on the label. Bathroom and toilet surfaces should be cleaned daily with household cleaner and then with a disinfecting bleach.
 

When is it Safe to Leave Home?

You may leave your home if all three of the following are true:
  • At least 24 hours have passed after you last had a fever (without using medicine to reduce your fever); and
  • COVID-19 symptoms (cough, shortness of breath, diarrhea) are getting better; and
  • At least 10 days have passed since the first day you got sick or since your first positive test for COVID-19.
If you never had any symptoms, you may leave your home 10 days after your first positive test for COVID-19.

Follow Oregon’s “Stay Home, Save Lives” order even after your symptoms have improved. Someone from the health department may call you to check on your recovery status.
 

What if Someone in my Household Becomes Sick?

If you or someone else in your household becomes sick with symptoms (cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fever, muscle/body aches, headaches, loss of smell or taste, sore throat, congestion, runny nose, fatigue, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting) it is possible that they have COVID-19. They should contact their healthcare provider for medical advice and ask if they should be tested, especially if they are over the age of 65, pregnant, or have chronic medical conditions. They should also follow all the precautions described above.
 

Isolation Protocol — When Isolating from Household Members is Not Possible

  • Stay at home and at least 6 feet from other people while in common spaces. You may exercise outside alone.
  • Stay in your own room as much as possible. 
  • If you are sharing a bathroom, all contact surfaces, or surfaces containing blood, urine, phlegm, stool or other bodily fluid must be sterilized using a household disinfectant or disinfecting wipe and then cleaned with a disinfecting bleach. Follow instructions on all labels. Wear gloves and a mask while disinfecting. 
  • Increase airflow in shared spaces like the kitchen or bathroom by opening windows and using a fan, when possible.
  • Wear a cloth, paper or disposable face covering when you are around other people or animals, and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a face covering, then people who live with you should not be in the same room with you. They should wear a face covering if they enter your room.
  • If you need help, have just one person who is healthy assist you.
    • If your helper comes into direct contact with you or any bodily fluids (including blood, urine, phlegm or stool) or is closer than 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or longer, that person will need to quarantine (that is, stay at home and away from others who could become infected). If your helper or other family member needs to quarantine because of close contact with you or any bodily fluids, the total quarantine time includes the duration of your recover time of 10 days plus an additional 10 days if they remain entirely well.
    • If they develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19 they need to contact their Primary Care Provider and tell them they are at risk for COVID-19 and what symptoms they are experiencing. If they test positive or develop two or more symptoms consistent with COVID-19, they would start their own 10 day isolation protocol.


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